Fitzroy Systems

Software for Structural Engineers

LUCID.

LUCID is a computer program for producing drawings and reinforcing steel schedules for a variety of reinforced concrete components. LUCID is not just an electronic drawing board, it is an 'expert detailer' which does the drawing for you, producing to-scale details.

The details produced by LUCID are text files, written in HPGL (Hewlett-Packard Graphics Language) and may be:

  • sent directly to printer (thus the LUCID detail may be printed on any printer which is supported by Windows)
  • edited by the supplied program called TAPE (Translator And Plot Editor) and then printed
  • converted to .DXF and read and edited by your own CAD system.

LUCID is an 'expert system' which knows about detailing and builds the detail using the knowledge contained within the LUCID database. The engineer merely has to guide LUCID by giving answers to the various questions which LUCID asks. This does not mean that LUCID is restricted to the knowledge contained within itself, for LUCID incorporates an easy to use drawing program called TAPE which allows the user to add to or amend the LUCID detail to incorporate the engineer's own expert knowledge.

Thus LUCID offers the best of both worlds:

  • the skills of an expert detailer
  • the means to add the engineer's expert knowledge and thereby produce a detail tailored to the job.

A current list of LUCID programs follows:

Foundations.

100 Notes on the detailing of foundations
110 Pile caps
120 Square and rectangular reinforced and mass concrete bases
130 Isolated, internal and edge strip footings

Retaining walls.

200 Notes on the detailing of retaining walls
210 Free standing cantilever retaining walls
220 Propped retaining walls

Culverts and subways.

300 Notes on the detailing of culverts and subways
310 Culverts and subways

Slabs.

400 Notes on the detailing of edge supported slabs and flat slabs
410 Simply supported single panel slabs
420 One way spanning slabs
430 Two way spanning slabs
440 Flat slabs
450 Flat slabs - shear reinforcement at columns
460 Holes and chairs for top reinforcement

Columns.

500 Notes on the detailing of columns
510 Square, rectangular and circular columns

Walls.

600 Notes on the detailing of walls
610 Walls

Staircases.

700 Notes on the detailing of in-situ staircases
710 In-situ staircases

Beams.

800 Notes on the detailing of beams
810 Simply supported and continuous beams
820 Cantilever beams

General.

900 General notes on LUCID
908 Component detailing using LUCID
910 Bar schedule
920 About MSDOS and access to it
940 Dot matrix printing of a LUCID drawing
941 Editor
952 Setting page length and colour
960 Demonstrating LUCID or lecturing about detailing
965 Compressing or uncompressing proforma details
967 Printing out the LUCID help file
996 How to compose a LUCID proforma detail

Historical Background.

Between the years 1971 and 1978 - a hundred or so firms collaborated in an organisation called LUCID and produced a national standard for detailing reinforced concrete. The driving force behind LUCID was Professor Len Jones of Loughborough University. Len Jones was supported by a team of engineers. Some 1000 high quality overlays (drawings or component parts) were produced to give a manual detailing system covering:

  • pile caps
  • mass and reinforced concrete bases
  • isolated, internal and edge strip footings
  • cantilever and propped retaining walls
  • culverts and subways
  • simply supported, one and two-way spanning continuous slabs
  • flat slabs
  • insitu staircases
  • walls
  • rectangular and circular columns
  • simply supported, continuous and cantilever beams.

Published papers on LUCID include:

  • LUCID - a system for the production of detail drawings by RH Mayo and Professor LL Jones pub. Building Technology and Management, July 1973
  • LUCID - an aid to structural detailing by Professor LL Jones pub. The Structural Engineer, January 1975
  • LUCID - a cooperative venture in CAD by LL Jones, AJM Soane, RH Mayo and P Charlton - CAD '82 Brighton

Having purchased the rights to LUCID, in 1992/93 LUCID was computerised by Fitzroy Computer Systems using the PRAXIS notation (as used in SCALE) to hold the proforma details. The development of the computer version of LUCID was carried out by Doug Brown, the digitising of the 1000 'overlays' by Sandra Brown, the utility TAPE (for editing the LUCID details and translating them into DXF format) by Clive Emberey.